#RPG – The Tower of Art RELEASED!

207670Buy it HERE

Hardcopy available at LULU

The Tower of Art is the first adventure/supplement for Tales of Gor, the Gorean Roleplaying Game.

As an introductory scenario this supplement presents a relatively simple and easy example
of such an adventure, as well as resources and additional material to improve your games (and the value of this supplement).

This adventure is designed for a typical group of 4-6 starting characters. It has a variety of
challenges for them to face in order to get players used to both the system and some of the aspects of Gor that new players may not be familiar with.

This supplement forms the model for future supplements. An adventure – with resources for
the Games Master – along with additional rules, ideas and thoughts that can make games better for everyone.

Ta Sardar Gor!

#RPG Tales of Gor Preview Released!

207667

You can check it out HERE.

More preview material potentially coming today…

Chronicles of Gor – Worldbook Sample ‘D’

DDesert Kaiila: The desert kaiila is similar to the kaiila used by the wagon people. A lofty, silken, long-necked creature it has a smooth gait and a proud bearing. The desert kaiila stands around twenty hands at the shoulder and is a swift runner with great stamina, able to cover over six-hundred pasangs in a day. While a swift and useful mount, desert kaiila are also temperamental and vicious. Desert kaiila are almost always tawny in color and unlike the more common kaiila suckle their young. Desert kaiila milk is reddish, with a strong salty taste and a high level of iron. Desert kaiila are omnivorous with broad, heavy, padded paws with webbed toes. This keeps them more stable on the sand, and especially in the dunes.

Observations:
I have a hard enough time with horses. Mounting a predatory, stinking, pest-ridden beast in the heat of the desert and before men who were born to the saddle is much worse than mounting a horse. The worse you can get with a horse is trodden on, the worst with kaiila is eaten. At least the desert breed is somewhat more mellow than the northern kaiila and as content to munch on plants as people.

Gorean Chronicles: Art by Michael Manning

The artist we hope to use throughout both books, Chronicles of Gor and World of Gor, is Michael Manning.

Michael Manning (born 1963) is an American comic book artist and writer, fine art illustrator, and traditionally trained animator currently based in Los Angeles, California. He is best known for his graphic novel series, The Spider Garden and Tranceptor, which combine elements of pan-sexual fetishism and BDSM culture with complex characters in science fiction and fantasy settings. He is also active in the supernatural horror and fantasy genres, drawing adaptations of the work of authors such as H.P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe, and Alexandre Dumas for the Graphic Classics comics anthology series, as well as illustrating an anachronistic version of the German folk epic, The Nibelungen.

The more money we have, the more Michael we can afford, so please, help FUND IT.

These are prelim sketches for one piece, if you want to see what his finished work looks like, please click on The Nibelungen link above.

Michael’s style is stark, graphically intense and most importantly – different. He will give Gor a distinctive and definitive style and visual appeal.

Art1

Art2

Chronicles of Gor – Worldbook sample ‘C’

Castes

FUND IT!

Caste System: Civilized Gor exists within a well developed and life-shaping caste structure. Everyone is born into a caste and, for the most part, will not change caste during their life. It is possible to, by companionship, apprenticeship or being accepted and initiated into the new caste, but most grow up proud of their caste and eager to take on its duties.

Children are considered to be of their father’s caste while female companions can retain their own caste or join their companion’s caste. While every caste has its secrets and its pride, regarding itself as essential, there are still divisions between the high castes and the low castes.

Rulers – administrators and Ubars – always come from the high castes and are advised by a council drawn from the high castes, though the Ubar need pay them no heed. Indeed, if a low caste ruler should ever rise, superstition tells that the city will fall to ruin.

Castes look after their own, providing caste sanctuary, contributing to caste based charities and taking part in entertainments and competitions determined by caste. Not all members born to a caste are necessarily talented enough to take up the main job associated with that caste. The physicians, for example, can only make the subtleties of their advanced medicine known to the most intelligent of those who enter the caste. Others may find work delivering medical products, working to grind ingredients or acting as couriers, taking scrolls of recipes and discoveries from one city to another.

Male children are trained in the workings of the caste from birth, alongside the rest of their education while women are not typically trained in the skills of the caste until they have given birth to two children. Despite this, many women run households, small businesses or make businesses of hobbies. They also often act as the ‘front’ of the caste, representatives of the rest of their caste in negotiations.

Outlaws and slaves lose their caste rights, though a freed slave may be able to reclaim them.

Chronicles of Gor – Urgent Update PRINT!

GorPromo1FUND IT!

You kept asking.

Initially I wasn’t going to offer print because it’s been so volatile and unpredictable that it often ends up torpedoing projects by costing them more than they raised.

After a lot of thought and calculation, and a lot of estimation, I think I can offer…

World of Gor: The Gorean Scrolls – $45

Chronicles of Gor: Gorean Role-Playing & World of Gor: The Gorean Scrolls – $75

Both will include both books on PDF.

People who are fans of Gor, but not role-players, will find World of Gor to be an invaluable reference and insight into the series, but won’t necessarily need (or want) the RPG book.

People who are primarily roleplayers will need both books to make a complete set with all the information that they need.

There’s a lot of estimation work involved here and these prices assume that we can raise the full amount and fill the books with the desired amount of illustration, making for the page count these estimates are based on. I think each book should have an RRP in the region of £20 and shipping, anywhere, is £10 or under. So this is the best I can really do given the goal is to raise money, not to offer a cheap pre-order.

I’ll do what I can to sweeten the deal as/when/if we get closer to or over the primary goal and I would appreciate your suggestions on what I can do to increase the value to supporters and get those extra bucks out of you.

Please do pass on the fundraiser info to any other fans of Gor, whether they’re gamers or not. The World Book should have a much broader appeal to fans of fantasy in general.

Chronicles of Gor – Press & Publicity

GorPromo1FUND IT!

There’s quite a lot of interest in the game and world book and a lot of speculation and scuttlebutt as well.

I’m not exactly hard to get a hold of and if you have a website, forum, group, page, podcast, radio show or youtube channel and want to talk to me about Gorean Chronicles the RPG or the World Book I’d be more than happy to answer questions and/or put in an appearance.

I have Skype, Google Hangouts, can get accounts or otherwise do what’s necessary if you want to talk to me.

If you want to meet me in person to talk about the game and you’re in the UK, something might be arranged, though I’ll need to check your bona-fides first.

First point of contact is a comment here, a contact on social media (especially Twitter) or via email.

My Gor

I was gifted the first twenty-four books of John Norman’s Chronicles of Gor when a friend of mine went away to university. I was still at school at the time, in my final year, voraciously reading any and all science fiction and fantasy I could find, at the rate of up to six books a day on weekends.

To receive over twenty books, completely new to me, out of the blue was an enormous gift and I threw myself into reading them, one after another until they were all done. Here was a series of books with much of the same fantastical imagination as Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Barsoom series or the Hyborian fantasies of Robert E. Howard, but drawing on the same imagery of Greek and Roman heroism I’d learned at school and from the films of Ray Harryhausen.

Where Burroughs’ and Howard coyly turned aside at the last minute, however, trapped by the relative prudishness of their times (for all the livid covers and descriptions of a more liberated – and naked – society), Norman’s hero did not. The fate of the handmaidens and slave girls that Tarl Cabot encountered was never in question, but then nor was the fate of the oiled, male silk slaves under the aloof, free women of Gor’s cities.

Tarl Cabot’s struggles adapting to the fierce Gorean world were in many ways a reflection of adolescence for me and for many others. To understand and accept the more adult and cutthroat world we were entering. For many others – in the days before the Internet – the Gorean world was also their first exposure to the aesthetic of BDSM, their first hint that this was something normal, or shared by others. The importance of that, to so many, along with his book Imaginative Sex cannot be underestimated.

Despite the great success of the Gorean cycle, selling between six and twelve million copies and Tarnsmen of Gor being reprinted twenty-two times, the Gorean series was interrupted in 1988 when it was dropped by its publisher. There were, as a result, thirteen years between Magicians of Gor in 1988 and Witness of Gor in 2001 and another seven years after that until Prize of Gor in 2008. ‘Political correctness’ in the late eighties and through the nineties made such sexually explicit and controversial fantasy difficult to know what to do with.

Fortunately the Internet rose during the same period and fans of Norman’s work began to form their own communities online. Forums and chatrooms sprang up by the dozen, Internet Relay Chat played host to dozens of Gorean roleplay rooms, people sold, resold and naughtily transcribed the books as they went out of print and created online resources for these communities as they arose. As the Internet advanced, so did the complexity of these resources and as graphical roleplay became possible it spread there, to the point where – in 2009 – it was estimated that there were some fifty-thousand Gorean role-players on Second Life alone.

The Internet would also come to the rescue of the series, in time, and the advent of cheap print on demand and ebooks has meant the series has managed to continue and the entire back catalog has become available to purchase once again, via the company Ereads, breathing new life into the series and bringing new revelations and new stories to its fans.

In all this time, however, there has never been an official Gorean role-playing game. Everything that exists online is unofficial and organized by fans, strange for a series of fantasy books whose publishing peak coincided with the boom period of the popularity of Dungeons & Dragons and other role-playing games.

High time it had one.