Mass Effect Part Four: Batarians

The Batarians are a race of four-eyed bipeds and hail from the world of Khar’shan. A disreputable species of isolationists the Batarians are known – beyond Batarian space – through their criminal element. Batarians who leave their world are exiles, renegades and criminals; often slavers, drug runners, smugglers, pirates and other dangerous sorts.

The Terminus Systems hve a heavy Batarian presence, organised on a scale that can put even small non-citadel races to shame. Their aggressive beligerance is a positive boon to their species in relatively uncivilsed space. Batarians are normally forbidden from leaving their home systems by their ever-present and paranoid government which may well be responsible for the exile of many of these raiders.

Batarian mercs, raiders and bandits do not push their luck too far, preferring profit-making work to out-and-out warfare though humans in particular draw their ire. Batarians tend to think that the human species has usurped their rightful position and reserve a special hatred for that species.

Batarians are most notable for their twin-pairs of eyes, one set atop the other. This double-stereo vision gives them keen eyesight and situational awareness and marks them out as good spotters, observers and snipers.

The Batarian government has a long history of conflict with other races, despite having been welcomed by the citadel races earlier in history. They have attacked almost every other species at one time or another, increasing their marginalisation. The final straw appears to have been the fight with humanity over the Skyllian Verge. The Citadel Council’s refusal to side with the Batarians over the ‘upstart’ humans provoked them to withdraw and close their borders.

The Batarian government has been directly and indirectly funding pirtes, terrorists and organised crime, a low-level war-by-proxy concentrated upon human colonies throughout the verge. These proxy forces were largely defeated in The Battle of Torfan and while Batarian sponsorship continues to plage human space with raids the problem is now under control.

Batarian’s place a huge emphasis on social position and caste. Speaking out of turn or above one’s station is frowned upon, even in criminal gangs. An accusation of poverty, worthlessness, is a moral insult. They consider species with less eyes to be less intelligent and talking to them can be unsettling, unsure which eyes to look into. Body language is also integral and in talking with any species other than another Batarian it is very hard for a Batarian not to grow upset at the poor stance of the other species.

Slavery is not only a practice of Batarian criminals, it is a deep part of their culture – despite its illegality in Citadel Space. They see no moral problem with slavery or with means of control such as implants, slave collars and drug addiction.
Slavery is an integral part of the batarian caste system, despite being illegal according to Council law, and it is currently unknown how the batarians maintained standing on the Citadel for so long with slavery still actively practiced. The custom is so deeply ingrained in batarian culture that batarians consider the Council’s anti-slavery standing to be prejudicial. Rogue batarian slave rings are feared throughout the galaxy, especially among colonists.

Batarian’s believe in an afterlife but their religion is a low-level thing, reinforcing their caste system and strictly guiding their way of life through the ‘Pillars of Strength’, a set of philosophical and moral guidelines that inform their leaders.

Their government, The Batarian Hegemony, is still actively hostile to humanity and the alliance but considered beneath the notice of the council races. They are consdered to not be worth bothering with and to be left to their own devices. They devote a huge amount of effort to maintainig their military and a blockade around their systems to refuse admittance to other races without consent.

Batarian Characters
Perception +1
Influence -1

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